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Cephalometric X-rays

The cephalometric X-ray is a unique tool that enables the dentist to capture a complete radiographic image of the side of the face.  X-rays in general offer the dentist a way to view the teeth, jawbone, and soft tissues beyond what can be seen with the naked eye.  Cephalometric X-rays are extraoral, meaning that no plates or film are inserted inside the mouth. Cephalometric and panoramic X-rays display the nasal and sinus passages, which are missed by intraoral bitewing X-rays.

Cephalometric X-rays are usually taken with a panoramic X-ray machine. The adapted machine will have a special cephalometric film holder mounted on a mechanical arm. An X-ray image receptor is exposed to ionizing radiation in order to provide the dentist with pictures of the entire oral structure. The advantage of both cephalometric and panoramic X-rays is that the body is exposed to less radiation.

Cephalometric X-rays are not as common as “full sets” or bitewing X-rays, but they serve several important functions:

  • Provide views of the side profile of the face.
  • Provide views of the jaw in relation to the cheekbone.
  • Provide information about “bad bites” or malocclusions.
  • Allow measurement of the teeth.
  • Identify fractures and other injuries to the teeth and jawbone.
  • Assists in orthodontic planning.

How are cephalometric X-rays taken?

Cephalometric X-rays are completely painless. The head is placed between the mechanical rotating arm and the film holder, which is placed on another arm.  The arm rotates around the head capturing images of the face, mouth, and teeth.  The clarity and sharpness of these images will depend on the positioning of the body. The images are usually magnified up to 30%, so any signs of decay, disease, or injury can be seen and treated.

After capturing cephalometric X-rays, the dentist will be able to see a complete side profile of the head. This can assist in orthodontic planning and allow an immediate evaluation of how braces might impact the facial profile and teeth.  Another common use for this type of X-ray is to determine specific measurements prior to the creation and placement of dental implants.

If you have any questions or concerns about cephalometric X-rays, please ask your dentist.

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Testimonials

I just wanted to send an update.
We got Sidney's tongue tie and lip tie revised 2 weeks ago today. Her top lip is looking great, she has great mobility and the stretches have really helped her lip muscles loosen up. I'm so pleased with the results.
Her tongue has gotten hard to stretch as she has figured out how to wiggle her tongue around to avoid the fingers, which I'm taking as a great sign. She's really learning how to move it around. When I eventually get under her tongue, there seems to be a bit of reattachment/regrowth, but since the mobility is there I'm not concerned. Just more motivation to keep up on the stretches, which she only mildly complains about these days.
I'm so happy to have a skilled dentist here in town to help her little mouth out. Keep up the good work.

Callie S.

Dear Dr. Boldt,
We've just made it to the two week mark since our tongue tie and upper lip revision with you. I just wanted to thank you for doing such a thorough revision and going deep enough to really make a difference. Since the night of the revision my son Denzel (5.5 months) began sleeping 9 hours continuously out of 12 through the night (as opposed to his usual 3-4 before needing to nurse) he also began pooping daily as opposed to every few days. Nursing is now pain free and his upper lip is no longer STIFF. I am so grateful to have someone in Edmonton skilled enough to understand and rectify his tt with Laser.

Denzel's Mom

Great experience! The staff are wonderful and it was easy to get an appointment at a time that suited us. My kids (5&7) loved the video games in the waiting area and the TV on the ceiling in the exam room.

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